3.29.2016

Maxwell House Coffee Concentrate Liquid for Iced Coffee



I tried this product last summer or Fall (?) and snapped some photos and put them into my computer files and then promptly forgot about them.  Well, not completely true.  I would remember or see them, decide putting my website watermark on them was too much work and writing a post was too much work... and well, it never got posted.

Since then I've bought 2 more of the House Blend flavor coffee concentrates from Maxwell and after making yet another iced coffee today I decided to get my butt in gear and tell my readers about it.

 Maxwell has 3 flavors out;  caramel, house blend and vanilla.  I've not bought the vanilla as I have vanilla coffee syrup I use so I didn't want waste money on it since this isn't a sponsored post.

The caramel flavor, in my opinion, tastes... funny.  Not all that good.  I'd rather use an unflavored version and use my caramel coffee syrup - which tastes awesome - but their caramel version?  Eh.

But let's talk House Blend.  Because that one is good. 

It only takes a short squirt into a glass of milk, almond milk, coconut milk or water; with a little ice and a shot of vanilla or other flavored coffee syrup if you wish or even a sprinkle of sugar or creamer if that's your thing.  I've used Stevia and other natural sweeteners when I've wanted a flavorful iced coffee.

Not only does it taste good, but it has a pretty good kick of caffeine at 50 mg per teaspoon.
If you are thinking to yourself, "I don't really like Maxwell House Coffee though" well, I don't drink Maxwell House coffee as a rule either.  But this is different - tastes different - and when you are mixing it with your own milk or water and any sweeteners or flavorings you wish; you probably can't tell what brand the concentrate is anyway.

Obviously I like this product since I've bought 3 of the House Blend (although the original Caramel flavor is still in the cupboard).  I still make iced coffee using other versions (I have an espresso maker to make espresso, I use my Keurig at the lowest ounce setting, or I use my Mr. Coffee Frappe' Maker... but this is one of many and it's the fastest!)

I find them in my local grocery and Walmart grocery for about $3.50 each.



About the Product
  • Delicious Refreshing House Blend Coffee taste. Contains Caffeine.
  • Made from Brewed Coffee
  • Bottle makes 10-8 fl oz servings.
  • Squeeze into water or milk and add ice or creamer









Related products available to purchase through Amazon if you can't find them locally;

Maxwell House Iced Coffee Concentrate, House Blend, 1.62 Ounce
Maxwell House Iced Coffee Concentrate, Caramel, 1.62 Ounce
Maxwell House Iced Coffee Concentrate, Vanilla, 1.62 Ounce























3.28.2016

Umm... yeah! Go Sports! I totally hope it goes into the net. Or a hole in the ground. Or wherever you want it to go.





If you've read Coffee Talking a little bit, you may have caught on that I don't really care about sports.
Which sport?  Um, that one.
And that one.
Yep, that one too.
You may have read the post about my conversation with Mr. Coffee regarding "me understanding who Peyton Manning is".

I. Do. Not. Care.

And yes, I've made my husband angrier when he was already angry after some big playoff football game when I uttered the words you apparently just 'do not say' - you know:  "But honey... it's just a game!"

I can totally relate to Leonard on Big Bang Theory when he wanted to show support to his then-girlfriend Penny by agreeing to watch a game with her, getting a selection of drinks and snacks ready and then painting "GO SPORTS!" on his stomach ... you know - to cover all bases whether she planned on watching football or baseball or basketball...





On a totally related topic but I didn't know it - I have liked the comedy singing duo Garfunkel and Oats for about 5 years now.  I hadn't thought of them lately so this afternoon, with coffee in hand, I went to the website to see if they had anything new out.  This isn't all THAT brand new - but new enough for me and I laughed because it's so me.






I promise I really  totally care who wins
If there's a net  or hoop or hole in the ground, I hope  they get it in
If they want to go to all the bases, I hope they do
If they're  supposed to run past a line or whatever, I hope they do that, too 

Sports go  sports!

May they top their opponents  numerically in the allotted time
Lest  they disenfranchise their audience 
and  see their revenues decline

May the  partakers be sturdy and rapid
In the  spirited energies they exert
May they be victorious in perpetuity
Don't I look  cute in this football shirt

Sports go sports! 
Athletics are number one! 
Participants are heroes! 
Go team  yeah!

This is the most important thing  that's ever occurred
The vicarious fulfillment of your dream that got deferred
You had aspirations as a kid  but you didn't have the skill
So you  watch genetically superior people do the things you never will

Sports go Sports! 

May the competitors you prefer 
best  their opposing equivalents:
So you can  somehow feel connected to the feat of  your self-appointed constituents
May the hours you spend watching post-match pontificators
Amplify the thrill of  being a witness
And better your  predictive aptitude
For your squad's  future physical fitness

Sports go  sports! 
Athletics are number one! 
Participants are heroes! 
Go team  yeah!

Watching able-bodied  millionaires play with each  other
Watching less agile millionaire  talk about it on TV
May they compile  copious points so they are rewarded and  meritorious
So you feel temporarily,  adjacently  victorious

Sports go  sports! 
Athletics are number one! 
Participants are heroes! 
Go team  yeah!

Every other word: 
Sports!   Sports!  Athletics!  Number!  Participants! Heroes!  Go!  Yeah!

Every other other word: 
Go!  Athletics!   Number!  Are!  Team!

Now in Latin:   
Ludis ire ludis
Arcu sunt  optimum
Participants sunt heroes
Ire  quadrigus sic

Now the truth:   
If you  could only throw a ball
You'd have a  hotter wife
Lots and lots of money
And a way better life
And a way better life   
Go Sports!

3.23.2016

Bernie Sanders - "That" moocher friend that lives in his Mom's basement until he's 40 but tells you how to run your life


Earlier this week I saw an online 'argument' between a young 20-something year old Bernie supporting woman and a handful of other people in which they were trying to teach her what Socialism was.  She was adamant that all Republicans were Socialists and was furious and ranting and raving about them and it.  Didn't matter that people tried to explain to her what Socialism is... didn't matter what they said.  She was almost foaming at the mouth with her anger against all conservative Republicans and their "Socialism".

*Chuckle*

So seems to be the gist of Sanders supporters.  Youth... full of energy and the need to be "a part of something!" but really have no idea what they are supporting.

I started to look into Sanders background and just shake my head.  What the heck?

I could type things out myself but these 3 quotes from other sources put it simply and easily by themselves......


__________________________________



http://spectator.org/blog/65498/bernie-sanders-didnt-make-paycheck-until-he-turned-40

"So, basically, Bernie Sanders was that jobless friend who hangs around coffee shops where he cons you into buying his drink, only to talk your ear off about how amazing Che Guevara was, and how he's living off the grid in an apartment without flooring or heat because he doesn't trust The Man because The Man is totally in the pocket of corporate America, even though you're meeting in a Starbucks and his order was way more complicated than yours. Every once in a while he mentions running for office, but it's usually left as a pipe dream because he's too lazy to ever get around to forming up a campaign, so he hangs out in his basement or yours, writing terrible stories for his "alternative political 'zine" and scouring thrift stores for drab, vaguely militaristic clothing.

Somehow, this guy managed to make it to Congress, where he earned his first real income, making him, of course, a career politician - if only because being a politician was literally his only career.

And it's not as though Sanders had the kind of rough upbringing that would lead one to assume his level of success was unprecedented within his family. Although he did grow up poor, as Business Insider notes, he did well enough - and his family did well enough - to send him to the University of Chicago, presumably where he acquired his left wing views, to get a degree he, apparently, never used, except as a resume builder when he was angling for his government paycheck forty years later. But, I suppose, his utter lack of economic education had to come from somewhere."


 _______________________________________


http://fusion.net/story/266885/bernie-sanders-resume-qualifications-experience/

"Sanders’ résumé started with a personal attributes section, under which he listed “Excellent Health” and “Divorced, One Son.” (Résumé experts generally advise putting your most recent work experience at the top, and saving personal details for the very bottom.)

The résumé then lists Sanders’ bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago, a BA in political science.
His employment history is brief, and even nondescript. “Mayor of Burlington” is easy enough, but “Freelance Writer, Carpenter, Youth Counselor, and State Employee” for 12 years? This should be more specific.

The next section touches on his involvement with the Liberty Union Party and some of its initiatives in Vermont in the 1970s, but not his multiple runs for governor. Weird.

I also found another Sanders résumé in the Vermont collection, from 1988, when he was running for Congress. (He lost that race, but would be elected to the House in 1990.)

This later résumé, which begins with “Only socialist Mayor in the United States,” does a much better job of putting the most relevant information about Sanders’ political experience up top, and saving some personal information for the bottom."

__________________________________


http://www.allenbwest.com/2016/02/we-just-found-out-what-bernies-first-job-was-it-all-makes-sense-now/

"Sanders spent most of his life as an angry radical and agitator who never accomplished much of anything. And yet now he thinks he deserves the power to run your life and your finances — “We will raise taxes;” he confirmed Monday, “yes, we will.”
One of his first jobs was registering people for food stamps, and it was all downhill from there.

Sanders took his first bride to live in a maple sugar shack with a dirt floor, and she soon left him. Penniless, he went on unemployment. Then he had a child out of wedlock. Desperate, he tried carpentry but could barely sink a nail. “He was a shi**y carpenter,” a friend told Politico Magazine. “His carpentry was not going to support him, and didn’t.”
Then he tried his hand freelancing for leftist rags, writing about “masturbation and rape” and other crudities for $50 a story. He drove around in a rusted-out, Bondo-covered VW bug with no working windshield wipers. Friends said he was “always poor” and his “electricity was turned off a lot.” They described him as a slob who kept a messy apartment — and this is what his friends had to say about him.

The only thing he was good at was talking … non-stop … about socialism and how the rich were ripping everybody off. “The whole quality of life in America is based on greed,” the bitter layabout said. “I believe in the redistribution of wealth in this nation.”

So he tried politics, starting his own socialist party. Four times he ran for Vermont public office, and four times he lost — badly. He never attracted more than single-digit support — even in the People’s Republic of Vermont. In his 1971 bid for U.S. Senate, the local press said the 30-year-old “Sanders describes himself as a carpenter who has worked with ‘disturbed children.’ ” In other words, a real winner.

He finally wormed his way into the Senate in 2006, where he still ranks as one of the poorest members of Congress. Save for a municipal pension, Sanders lists no assets in his name. All the assets provided in his financial disclosure form are his second wife’s. He does, however, have as much as $65,000 in credit-card debt.

No wonder millennials connect so well with the guy."





3.22.2016

5 Minutes of History with your Morning Coffee - An Incomplete Education: Islam


Source:  An Incomplete Education - A coffee table style book with a little of everything and just enough of almost anything, to teach you what you probably didn't learn (or weren't paying attention to) in high school and college.  First published in 1987, it was an instant best seller and has been revised and updated many times since as it continues to sell copies.  Our world has changed quite a bit since 1987 (and this version released in 1995) but it's still good at giving you a quick and basic overview of many topics within about 5 minutes with your morning coffee.




Islam:  The youngest of the monotheistic megafaiths.  In A.D. 622, it's official birth year, Islam was little more than a gleam in the prophet Muhammad's eye.  Less than 200 years later, it was the power behind an empire that stretched from Spain to India.  Of course, Muhammad didn't really start from scratch;  as a Bedouin trader living on the outskirts of Mecca, he'd already picked up a lot of gossip about Judaism and Christianity by the time he was ready to start having divine revelations of his own.  As a result, Islam bears an uncanny likeness to its two predecessors, though with variations that, from the beginning, made it highly appealing to the common man (and we do mean man) as well to certain fierce desert tribes prepared to appreciate Muhammad's policy of winning through decapitation.

The main attraction of Islam (Arabic for 'submission to the will of God') is its utter simplicity.  Your average Muslim (Arabic for "one who submits") can get to Heaven not by striving for some quasi-mystical and pretty much unobtainable state of grace but simply by honoring the Five Pillars of Islam.  First and most important of these is the affirmation of faith, in the words "There is no God but Allah and Muhammad is his prophet."   Say this with real feeling just once in your life and no one can accuse you of not being a true Muslim (although only you and Allah know for sure).  Two:  Pray five times a day, turning towards Mecca (no need to check your watch; just listen for the call of the muezzin and hit the ground when everyone else does).  Three:  Fast from sunup to sundown throughout the entire month of Ramadan (and if you're a well-to-do twentieth-century Muslim, binge-eat into the wee-hours).  Four:  Make the hajj the pilgrimage to Mecca, at least once if you can afford it (luckily you no longer have to travel on foot or by camel;  flights leave daily from most major cities).  Five:  Give alms, unless you're so poor you have to beg them.  And if you want to earn bonus points to ensure a smooth entry into Heaven, simply contrive to die while fighting a Holy War.

In case you get confused, you can look up the essentials in the Koran, the one and only sacred text of Islam, which contains the words of Allah as revealed to Muhammad.  You may find the going a bit tricky, however, since Muhammad wrote in a rhythmic Arabic that's completely untranslatable.  Join the club;  three quarters of the Muslim world is now composed of non-Arabs and none of them can read their own Scriptures, either.  Anyway, most of the Koran is devoted to retelling  the stories of the Old and New Testaments from the Muslim - that is, the correct and uncorrupted - point of view.  (For instance, the five great early prophets were really Adam, Noah, Abraham - the first Muslim - Moses, and Jesus.  Alexander the Great was a prophet too, and Muhammad was the last to carry Allah's divine word to man; and that's Allah, by the way, not Yahweh, which, must have been some sort of typo.)  The Koran won't give you much detail about ethical behavior or daily ritual; for that you'll have to turn to the Hadith, the collected sayings of Muhammad, which, almost everyone acknowledges, are probably not authentic.

The Muslim world is meant to be a theocracy, and it's in the who's-running-the-show department that Islam splits into its only two major sects, Sunni and Shi'ah.  The Sunnis, who comprise about 90 percent of all Muslims today, are the ones you don't hear much about;  staid and relatively tolerant, they are determinists who believe in rule by tradition and consensus.  The Shiites, who live mostly in Iran and Iraq, believe in free will; they are, most often, the radical reformers, who, like fundamentalist Christians, are convinced the world is going to hell in a hand-basket.  They are given to dire proclamations, strict proscriptions, and the cutting off of hands in public square.  The Shiites believe in rule by twelve imams, or perfect leaders, under whom the ayatollahs compose a sort of middle management cadre.

From its inception, Islam has had great success in winning converts in hot, arid, impoverished countries where the locals are susceptible to a lot of shouting and sword-brandishing, and to the promise of a Heaven that, unlike home, consists of green meadows and babbling brooks.  Another lure:  Traditional Islam is basically egalitarian and flexible;  follow the simple rules and nobody is going to torture you for heresy or shun you because of the color of your skin.  Feminists, pacifists, and drunk drivers, however, need not apply.




__________________________________________________







An Incomplete Education When it was originally published in 1987, An Incomplete Education became a surprise bestseller. Now this instant classic has been completely updated, outfitted with a whole new arsenal of indispensable knowledge. Here's your chance to fill in the gaps left by your school years, reacquire all the facts you once knew then promptly forgot, and become the Renaissance man or woman you always suspected you could be!

_______________________________________________

An Incomplete Education: 3,684 Things You Should Have Learned but Probably Didn't

3.08.2016

Random Coffee Talk: Childhood jingles and car songs: Pepsi-Cola hits the spot!

Rambling over coffee.....

Sometimes memories from childhood jump into my brain and make me smile.
This is one of them.

As an itty bitty child we (my siblings and I) were often traveling on long car trips to visit relatives with my parents.  Being the 70's our car trips were filled with sleeping, entertaining ourselves by watching rain drops race across the windows, counting power line poles or watching the racing dotted lines on the road outside the window.

I loved long night drives the best; pre-mandatory seatbelt laws, I would call dibs on the back window.  Laying up in the area behind the back seat over the speakers in the back window, gazing out the glass to the stars and moon above.  One brother would then get to lay across the back seat and the 3rd brother, curling on the backseat floor, head on the hump.  Our baby brother came along in 1979 and by then he was in a car seat full time and the laws were changing; he never knew the joy of star gazing on long drive homes on Christmas Eve night, watching the skies for a glimpse of Santa and the red of Rudolph's nose.

Alas, I've gone off topic again.  Blame it on the coffee. 


During drives across state to visit my grandparents, cousins or one of my Dads jaunts to go 'see a guy about a car' or a set of tires, my Dad would tend to sing and teach me old 50's and 60's music and had a special penchant for Elvis.  By the time I was 3 years old I could belt out "Wake up Little Susie" "Chantilly Lace" and a whole host of songs.

My Mother would sometimes teach us songs although she wasn't as enthusiastic about it as Dad was.  This is how I learned "Jesus Loves Me" and a Swedish hymn from the 1800's, Tryggare kan ingen vara (yes, I am maternally Swedish and paternally German with a few other things thrown in for good measure).  Interestingly enough, she wasn't especially religious, yet, when desperate to come up with songs to entertain us with, she managed to dredge up songs from the brief moment in life when she attended Sunday school as a child.  Thus, we learned "Jesus Loves the Children of the World" and such.




Tryggare kan ingen vara
Än Guds lilla barnaskara
Stjärnan ej på himlafästet
Fågeln ej i kända nästet

Herren sina trogna vårdar
Uti Sions helga gårdar
Över dem Han sig förbarmar
Bär dem uppå fadersarmar


But as a child, I have to admit that 'bathroom humor' -  to a 4 year old - wins the prize.

And burned forever in my memory is what I thought of as hilariously funny at the time...  the old "Pepsi Cola Hits the Spot" jingle that my Mom learned when she was a little girl and passed down to me.  It was years before I realized what it was really about as "pushing the button and pulling a chain" was a foreign concept to me; born after flush toilets were long in service.

Pepsi-cola hits the spot!
Second minute, you're on the pot.
Push the button.
Pull the chain.
Pepsi-cola down the drain!










From the news: It happened to me...I left my kids in the car and now I'm under investigation

From the news:  It happened to me...I left my kids in the car and now I'm under investigation
Source:  http://news.yahoo.com/happened-left-kids-car-now-170000556.html

______________________________

"Do you think what you did is OK?"

What do I say? If I say "no," does it mean I acted maliciously? If I say "yes," does it mean I'm incapable of knowing when I've made a bad decision? If I admit my judgment is fallible, do they take the kids away right here and now?

As I begin this writing, my good name is two days away from the last hurdle it must clear before I can breathe again: a nurse who works with child services is going to come to my house to "see" my kids. She's more or less the last person in a long series who will be paid to pass judgment on me in an official capacity — one who, I hope, will declare me "fit," allowing me to put the humiliating spectacle of being investigated for child neglect behind me.

One day last November, I went to pick up my older son from school, as I do at 2:30 p.m. nearly every weekday. My toddler was with me, as he usually is. He'd been up all night with a stomach bug, and I'd been up with him. I was thoroughly tired when it came time to put him into the car, though he was already feeling better. Holding down some solids, even.

I arrived at the school and met my four-year-old at the front gate. He looked sort of green as he limply hugged my legs with the arm that wasn't toting his Avengers lunch bag. I asked him how school was and he didn't answer.

Then, as we started toward the car, he began to vomit, all over the parking lot. Everyone — parents, grandparents, teachers, other kids — freaked out. Barf flew, arms flailed. People ran around trying to do something useful and mostly failing. It's all pretty blurry, actually, except the physical memory of his skinny little body in my arms, doubled over and heaving.

When the retching stopped, I rushed the poor kid to the nearest restroom to get him out of his barfy clothes. I left his (mostly clean) undershirt on, but he hates short sleeves, so I gave him the ratty old sweater I'd been wearing to soothe him. Meanwhile, one of the women who works at the school stood near my car, keeping my toddler, still strapped into his car seat, company as a custodian dumped sawdust on the multiple pools of vomit that had come flying out of my kid.

After a hasty cleanup, I got my whiny, sad, sick little boy into his car seat. I was worried he was going to vomit again. I was frazzled and exhausted and spattered with puke. But I needed to pick up some supplies from the supermarket, and seeing as how I didn't expect my husband home until late at night, I didn't think I'd find a better time to get them.

Chicken broth, Jell-O, saltines, Gatorade, children's ibuprofin, and acetaminophin for the fever after the nausea passed.

I'd originally planned to take the boys with me after school, but the preschooler was in sorry shape, and I wasn't sure it'd be a good idea to move him. Then, he fell asleep in the five minutes it took to drive to the store. I tried, futilely, to wake him.

So what do I do?

The temperature outside is in the 60s, and I estimate that I can be in and out of the store in about 10 minutes. I open the sunroof and crack all the windows. I turn the car off, get out, lock the kids in, and speed walk up to the doors that whoosh open for me automatically. I gather the stuff I need and get in line behind an old woman who seems to be trying to haggle down the price of something based on an outdated store mailer. Why do I always get in line behind this lady? I check my watch a million times.

It takes me about 15 minutes, all told, to get back to the car. 

By this time, police officers have descended. Looking in at my kids, tapping on the windows, talking to each other. Talking to a man who turns and gives me a distinctly filthy look as I run up with my bags, shouting, "Hey! That's my car!"

They ask me what happened. They ask me to explain myself, to break down the events that led up to this moment. I answer their questions and they tell me I am "making excuses."

"My wife was a stay-at-home-mom, and she always asked for help in situations like this. Don't you have someone to call?"

"You didn't have a blanket you could use to put on him in the cart? You know you should always have a blanket in the car with kids."

"Don't you have neighbors you can call? Don't you know any of your neighbors?"

I try to explain that everyone is at work. My mom, my dad, my sisters, my husband, my cousins, my brother-in-law. Everyone works during the day. I tell them we just moved in that spring, and we don't know any neighbors well enough to trust them to watch our kids. I tell them that I am tired, that I have been up all night, that there's still vomit drying on my clothes, that look — for Chrissakes — I am here for the stuff I need to take care of my sick kids. I start opening shopping bags to show them. 

"Ma'am. Stop making excuses."

Police cruisers continue to roll up to the scene. There are at least four now. They already know the story they want. They have to make sure the plot points fit.

One officer tells me it is 85 degrees inside the car. It's not. They tell me the guy who called them said he'd been standing there with my kids for half an hour. Not possible. 

"Your kids are terrified," they assert as my toddler beams at me with his huge, beautiful smile and as his ailing big brother falls back asleep in my ratty old sweater. 

"Mommy!" the toddler tells them, pointing at me, proudly.

The guy who called the cops on me is lingering, trying to get in on the action. 

"Is there anything else I can do?" he asks the police, looking back and forth between me and my children. I resist the urge to tell him what he can do.

I know what they want me to do, but I can't do it in front of my kids. I can't look into the knowing faces and tell them I have been wrong, even though I know it will go easier on me if I just say the words that will reassure the panel of white, male authority arranged before me that I understand it is their right and their place to judge.
"Do you think what you did is okay?"

Despite knowing better, I give the answer I always give when I'm unwilling to admit defeat:
"I guess not."

Predictably, this is not good enough. 

"You guess not?"

They write me up. I glare at them, at the ground. I clench my fists and my jaw. It's all I have.
I don't break down crying until I am home and the boys are resting on the couch, watching cartoons.
The next day, a social worker came to my house. She was Latina, like me. Small and brown. She talked to me as though I were an intelligent human being, and it was easy to admit to her that I made a mistake. I can see that she knew that it was probably ridiculous that she had to be there.

Nearly three months later, I'm almost through the gauntlet. The social worker told me this should all be behind me within a couple of weeks, allowing for processing time.

I am terrified that despite this creeping dread, if I'm ever in a position like this again, I won't be able to say, "Yes, I fucked up. Please forgive me. I am so sorry. You're right."


_________________________________________



My thoughts over coffee about this news story, to come. 




3.02.2016

One Minute History with your Morning Coffee: Who was John Peter Zenger? Why is he important to the First Amendment and Freedom of Press?


Who was John Peter Zenger?

John Peter Zenger was a New York City printer who was accused of seditious libel in 1735.  His case changed the definition of libel in American courtrooms and laid the foundation for freedom of the press.

The German born Zenger immigrated to the American colonies in 1710, when he was 13 years old.  He found a job as a printer's apprentice, working on the colony's official newspaper, the New York Gazette.  Fifteen years later he began his own operation, which was mostly concerned with printing religious pamphlets.  In 1733 New York received a new colonial governor from England:  William Cosby quickly earned the contempt of hte colonists, both rich and poor.  Prosperous businessmen who opposed Cosby and his grievous tactics approached Zenger, offering to back a newspaper that he would be edit and publish.  Zenger agreed and on November 5, 1733, the first issue of the Weekly Journal was released.  It included scathing criticisms of the royal governor, raising Cosby's ire.  After burning several issues of the papers, Cosby had Zenger arrested in November 1734.  The editor-publisher continued to operate the journal from inside his jail cell, dictating editorials to his wife through the door.


Now for the 5 minute history with your morning coffee....  the story continues.

Zenger's case went to trial in August 1735.  Prominent Philadelphia attorney Andrew Hamilton, considered the best lawyer in the colonies, came to Zenger's defense.  Hamilton admitted his client was guilty of publishing the papers but, he argued, that in order for libel to be proved, Zenger's statements had to be both false and malicious.  The prosecution contested the definition of libel, asserting that libelous statements are any words that are "scandalous, seditious, and tend to disquiet the people."   The court agreed with the prosecution, and Hamilton was therefore unable to bring forth any evidence to support the truth of the material Zenger printed in the Weekly Journal.  The defense argument was not heard until the closing statement was made by Hamilton; his summation stands as one of the most famous in legal history.  He accused the court of suppressing evidence, urging the jury to consider the court's actions "as the strongest evidence," and went on to declare that liberty is the people's "only bulwark against lawless power... Men who injure and oppress the people under their administration provoke them to cry out and complain."  The brilliant attorney closed by urging the gentlemen of the jury to take up the cause of liberty, telling them that by so doing, they will have "baffled the attempt of tyranny."  The seven jury members were convinced by Hamilton's impassioned speech and found Zenger not guilty.

Discharged from prison the next day, Zenger returned to his printing business, publishing the transcripts of his own trial.  While colonial officials were reluctant to accept the case's ruling on the definition of libel, the caswe became famous throughout the American colonies.  And once the colonists had thrown off England's royal rule and established a new republic, the nation's founding fathers codified the Zenger trial's ruling in the Bill of Rights:  The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees freedom of press.






_________________________________________



The Handy History Answer Book, Second Edition (The Handy Answer Book Series)

A concise guide to all things historical, this compendium addresses people, times, and events in a wide-ranging and comprehensive manner, complemented by helpful illustrations and a chronology of major events. 

Some of the history-making events include the election of George W. Bush, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; spectacular images from probes in outer space, medical advances and debate, and many new scientific discoveries on Earth; a devastating earthquake in Iran and the deadly tsunami in Asia; the downfall of Enron and the comeback of Apple, as well as the dot-com bubble burst. Beginning with a section on historical eras, this popular reference source tracks history and organizes information in 13 specific subject sections, ranging from politics and war to science and religion. It tackles exploration and settlement, technological advances, legal fireworks, financial and business events, social movements, natural and man-made disasters, medicine and disease, and art and culture. This resource is the perfect fingertip, time-traveling guide through the pages of history.

The 2015 release edition;

The Handy American History Answer Book (The Handy Answer Book Series)

One Minute History with your Morning Coffee: What was the Domesday Book?

What was the Domesday Book?

It is an important document surviving from the reign of England's William I, a Norman who had conquered England in 1066 to become king.  He ordered the survey so that he could have a complete record of England's lands, property owners, and resources. He used this information to his advantage, even taking possession of some properties thereafter.  The census is considered an excellent record of Europe's Middle Ages (500-1350).





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The Handy History Answer Book, Second Edition (The Handy Answer Book Series)

A concise guide to all things historical, this compendium addresses people, times, and events in a wide-ranging and comprehensive manner, complemented by helpful illustrations and a chronology of major events. 

Some of the history-making events include the election of George W. Bush, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; spectacular images from probes in outer space, medical advances and debate, and many new scientific discoveries on Earth; a devastating earthquake in Iran and the deadly tsunami in Asia; the downfall of Enron and the comeback of Apple, as well as the dot-com bubble burst. Beginning with a section on historical eras, this popular reference source tracks history and organizes information in 13 specific subject sections, ranging from politics and war to science and religion. It tackles exploration and settlement, technological advances, legal fireworks, financial and business events, social movements, natural and man-made disasters, medicine and disease, and art and culture. This resource is the perfect fingertip, time-traveling guide through the pages of history.

The 2015 release edition;

The Handy American History Answer Book (The Handy Answer Book Series)

One Minute History With Your Morning Coffee: What is the difference between socialism and communism?


What is the difference between socialism and communism?

In practice, there is little distinction between the two systems, which both rely on the elimination of private property and the collective ownership of goods.  But in theory, there are distinctions between the two.  According to Marxism, socialism is a transition state between capitalism and communism:  In socialism, the state (or government) still exists, and is in control of property and the programs for collectivization.  Marxist theory holds that communism is the final stage of society - after the state has dissolved.  In a communist society economic goods and property are distributed equally among the people.








The Handy History Answer Book, Second Edition (The Handy Answer Book Series)

A concise guide to all things historical, this compendium addresses people, times, and events in a wide-ranging and comprehensive manner, complemented by helpful illustrations and a chronology of major events. 

Some of the history-making events include the election of George W. Bush, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; spectacular images from probes in outer space, medical advances and debate, and many new scientific discoveries on Earth; a devastating earthquake in Iran and the deadly tsunami in Asia; the downfall of Enron and the comeback of Apple, as well as the dot-com bubble burst. Beginning with a section on historical eras, this popular reference source tracks history and organizes information in 13 specific subject sections, ranging from politics and war to science and religion. It tackles exploration and settlement, technological advances, legal fireworks, financial and business events, social movements, natural and man-made disasters, medicine and disease, and art and culture. This resource is the perfect fingertip, time-traveling guide through the pages of history.


The 2015 release edition;

The Handy American History Answer Book (The Handy Answer Book Series)
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