4.16.2019

Pondering over Coffee: The abortion debate - and the difference between the UDDA on when a human is declared 'dead' verses when a baby is declared 'alive'


When New York passed the law making it OK to kill a baby right up until it would naturally be born - and even letting it die if it happened to survive the abortion, it bothered me and I found myself pondering a lot of different things over my morning coffee.  When more states started to argue the same 'law', I watched, read, and pondered over morning coffee.  Then a couple states declared a heartbeat law - if the baby has a heartbeat, it's alive and you cannot kill it by abortion.  The fight over 'when' a child is able to legally be killed while still protected in its mother's womb goes on....

And it was during the morning I was reading a couple of those news articles that I clicked on another story that dealt with doctor's declaring someone 'dead' or 'alive' and when they make the call to do everything in their power  to keep them alive, based on a few of the medical 'tests' they do.

This could be a really, really long post.  SO much to this topic!  But, this is supposed to be a quick, 'rambling over coffee' entry.  Not a dissertation or a novel. 

So I looked at the uniform declaration of death.  There is actually an act drafted in 1981 by a Presidential commission so everyone could get on board with the same 'rules' as to what constitutes a person being legally declared dead.  It's a model states could use and emulate.



UDDA Overview

The Uniform Declaration of Death Act was drafted in 1981 by a President's Commission study on brain death. It was approved by both the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Bar Association (ABA) shortly after its publication. Health care is primarily handled on a state-by-state basis, so the intent of the Act was to provide a model for states to emulate.
 The UDDA offers two definitions for when an individual may legally be declared dead:
  1. Irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions; or
  2. Irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem.
The most common type of death is the first one, in which the heart has stopped beating and/or the patient is no longer breathing (usually followed by brain death). But sometimes (as in the second definition), an individual may be kept "alive" through the use of ventilators and feeding tubes even though there is zero brain activity. Most states consider brain dead individuals legally dead and remove them from life support, although the body's other life functions may be maintained until organs are harvested for donation.

Well... that got me thinking about those two definitions.

Because babies have working circulatory and respiratory functions in utero.
And babies have working functions of the brain, including the brain stem.

So... doesn't that mean that unborn babies should by law be declared 'alive'?

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Then I did a quick search of baby development stages.




Week 21: Baby can suck his or her thumb
Week 25: Baby responds to your voice
Week 26: Baby's lungs develop
Week 26: Baby's lungs develop

Twenty-six weeks into your pregnancy, or 24 weeks after conception, your baby's lungs are beginning to produce surfactant, the substance that allows the air sacs in the lungs to inflate — and keeps them from collapsing and sticking together when they deflate.
This week marks the end of the second trimester. At 27 weeks, or 25 weeks after conception, your baby's nervous system is continuing to mature.

Week 28: Baby's eyes partially open

Twenty-eight weeks into your pregnancy, or 26 weeks after conception, your baby's eyelids can partially open and eyelashes have formed. The central nervous system can direct rhythmic breathing movements and control body temperature.

Week 32: Baby practices breathing

Week 33: Baby detects light


Fetal development 31 weeks after conception

Thirty-three weeks into your pregnancy, or 31 weeks after conception, your baby's pupils can change size in response to a stimulus caused by light.




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Seems to me it's pretty black and white.
The same rules that legally declare someone alive and it's murder to let them die or not offer medical care, certainly aren't applying to the smaller sized human who has those same functions but is allowed to be killed with a scissor snip to the back of their neck, with saline injected into their body and to have their little arms, legs and head ripped violently from their body in an abortion.

Can you just picture someone on a hospital bed on a ventilator; being examined by doctors; they shine a light in their eyes to see if the pupils react (they do) and the patients heart is beating.  But the doctors declare them ok to kill anyway?  So they get a large pair of sharp scissors and snip the back of the patients neck to severe their spinal cord or inject the patient with a saline solution to kill them.  And because they can, just grab a saw and saw through the body's arms and legs and rip them off - tossing them aside into a body bag laying there on the floor.

All done.  Nurse, clean up this mess. I'm going home to have a beer.





It's just the coffee talking..............







https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/fetal-development/art-20046151
https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/fetal-development/art-20045997

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