10.11.2020

This week I will overcome my apprehension and venture into the world of pressure canning

A couple months ago I read that because of the Spring quarantines due to Covid-19, online sales of lingerie and all underwear was up.  Apparently when people stayed home from work and were shut up in their homes for a couple months, they spent a lot of time... ummm... with certain extra-curricular activities online and on their phones that needed some fancy-dancy undies.  

Since my husband is an essential worker and basically our lives didn't change at all except for a step-by-step decontamination every night when he got home, I can tell you those kind of 'too much time on my hands' extra-curricular activities weren't happening and I didn't feel the need to buy a bunch of lacy anything.  But like the rest of society, I did find myself buying things I had 'put off' or didn't prioritize or didn't want/need before social distancing was a thing.

 

 

Something I've kind-of, maybe, but not really wanted was a pressure canner.  But then, I didn't.  Then I kind of did, but then... I didn't.

About 20 years ago I put in a garden that simply went insane with abundance.  We kept up with the green beans, peas and such but we had baskets of tomatoes and extra peppers, so I soon found myself learning to make and can homemade salsa.  

For the next 10 years I happily made and canned salsa, jams, jellies and tomato juice.  I did pickles sometimes but mostly salsa as our family preferred mine over any store-brand.  But these items do not require pressure canning to be safe.  They are items that can easily be made with water-processing due to the acidity levels.  

I've never needed or wanted a pressure canner because the foods I liked to can didn't need one.  

A few years ago I started to think about long term food storage options, and at the same time, started to see some foods that I hadn't thought of canning before.  I started to research canners and decided I'd really like an All-American pressure canner.  But two things stopped me.

First, people online were talking about how you had to look up your elevation, use a chart to find the pressure you needed for your location verses the foods you were canning and then determine the size and style jars to figure out the 'pressure and time' to process the foods.

That sounded like a lot of work!

Second, the fear factor.  There were all these warnings that if you didn't do it just right your pot would blow up.  (Now I know, waaaaay overblown but at the time, it scared me.)

Third, they are freaking expensive!

Priority for investing in a pressure canner went WAY DOWN.

I STILL didn't really WANT to can vegetables or meats... it was just an option for longer term food storage I was interested in for emergency pantry options.  But not interested enough to spend $250-350 dollars on.

🠊🠊🠊🠊🠊🠊🠊 FAST FORWARD TO 2020

 

In the past 6 months I've had a renewed interest in canning.  But just when I decided I would spring for the expensive but ever-lasting All-American canner, I realized it too was a product of the COVID-19 shortages.  Sigh.  

But in my quest for a large pressure canner from a reputable source I DID find one; although I ended up with a Presto brand - still very very highly rated and loved by a lot of grannies who have been canning for oodles of years.  Plus... Presto was more affordable than All-American.

I'm just a little (very) bit excited!!!

So this week I will overcome my apprehension and venture into the world of pressure canning.  Woo-whoo!  











 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Complete Guide to Pressure Canning: Everything You Need to Know to Can Meats, Vegetables, Meals in a Jar, and More 

 

 

Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving

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