It's Just the Coffee Talking: Countries that require MORE infant vaccinations have a HIGHER rate of infant death.

Was pondering these articles (from government websites) regarding infant vaccinations.  This was using 2009 figures and we give MORE vaccinations now than we did then but the information was interesting.
 
Among 34 nations analyzed, those that require MORE infant vaccinations have a HIGHER rate of infant death.  The countries (like Sweden) who have far fewer vaccines shot into their babies have fewer deaths as well.  There was also some interesting information about 'sudden infant death' numbers and how they've been construed to a narrative that really, just doesn't hold up.
 
Interesting read over afternoon coffee.....
 
 
 
 
Read More from the Source:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3170075/ 

 

Infant mortality

The infant mortality rate is expressed as the number of infant deaths per 1000 live births. According to the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), which keeps accurate, up-to-date infant mortality statistics throughout the world, in 2009 there were 33 nations with better infant mortality rates than the United States (Table 1). The US infant mortality rate of 6.22 infant deaths per 1000 live births ranked 34th.

Table 1.

2009 Infant mortality rates, top 34 nations

RankCountryIMR
1Singapore2.31
2Sweden2.75
3Japan2.79
4Iceland3.23
5France3.33
6Finland3.47
7Norway3.58
8Malta3.75
9Andorra3.76
10Czech Republic3.79
11Germany3.99
12Switzerland4.18
13Spain4.21
14Israel4.22
15Liechtenstein4.25
16Slovenia4.25
17South Korea4.26
18Denmark4.34
19Austria4.42
20Belgium4.44
21Luxembourg4.56
22Netherlands4.73
23Australia4.75
24Portugal4.78
25United Kingdom4.85
26New Zealand4.92
27Monaco5.00
28Canada5.04
29Ireland5.05
30Greece5.16
31Italy5.51
32San Marino5.53
33Cuba5.82
34United States6.22

CIA. Country comparison: infant mortality rate (2009). The World Factbook. www.cia.gov (Data last updated 13 April 2010).

Immunization schedules and vaccine doses

A literature review was conducted to determine the immunization schedules for the United States and all 33 nations with better IMRs than the United States., The total number of vaccine doses specified for infants aged less than 1 year was then determined for each country (Table 2). A vaccine dose is an exact amount of medicine or drug to be administered. The number of doses a child receives should not be confused with the number of ‘vaccines' or ‘injections' given. For example, DTaP is given as a single injection but contains three separate vaccines (for diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis) totaling three vaccine doses.

Table 2.

Summary of International Immunization Schedules: vaccines recommended/required prior to one year of age in 34 nations

NationVaccines prior to one year of ageTotalb dosesGroup (range of doses)
SwedenDTaP (2), Polio (2), Hib (2), Pneumo (2)121 (12–14)
JapanDTaP (3), Polio (2), BCG12
IcelandDTaP (2), Polio (2), Hib (2), MenC (2)12
NorwayDTaP (2), Polio (2), Hib (2), Pneumo (2)12
DenmarkDTaP (2), Polio (2), Hib (2), Pneumo (2)12
FinlandDTaP (2), Polio (2), Hib (2), Rota (3)13
MaltaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3)152 (15–17)
SloveniaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3)15
South KoreaDTaP (3), Polio (3), HepB (3)15
SingaporeDTaP (3), Polio (3), HepB (3), BCG, Flu17
New ZealandDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (2), HepB (3)17
GermanyDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), Pneumo (3)183 (18–20)
SwitzerlandDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), Pneumo (3)18
IsraelDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3)18
LiechtensteinaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), Pneumo (3)18
ItalyDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3)18
San MarinoaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3)18
FranceDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), Pneumo (2), HepB (2)19
Czech RepublicDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), BCG19
BelgiumDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), Pneumo (2)19
United KingdomDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), Pneumo (2), MenC (2)19
SpainDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), MenC (2)20
PortugalDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), MenC (2), BCG214 (21–23)
LuxembourgDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (2), Pneumo (3), Rota (3)22
CubaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (4), MenBC (2), BCG22
AndorraaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), Pneumo (3), MenC (2)23
AustriaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), Pneumo (3), Rota (2)23
IrelandDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), Pneumo (2), MenC (2), BCG23
GreeceDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), Pneumo (3), MenC (2)23
MonacoaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), Pneumo (3), HepA, BCG23
NetherlandsDTaP (4), Polio (4), Hib (4), Pneumo (4)245 (24–26)
CanadaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), Pneumo (3), MenC (2), Flu24
AustraliaDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (4), Pneumo (3), Rota (2)24
United StatesDTaP (3), Polio (3), Hib (3), HepB (3), Pneumo (3), Rota (3), Flu (2)26

a These four nations were excluded from the analysis because they had fewer than five infant deaths.

b DTaP is administered as a single shot but contains three separate vaccines (for diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis). Thus, DTaP given three times in infancy is equivalent to nine vaccine doses. Immunization schedules are for 2008–2009.,

Nations organized into data pairs

The 34 nations were organized into data pairs consisting of total number of vaccine doses specified for their infants and IMRs. Consistent with biostatistical conventions, four nations—Andorra, Liechenstein, Monaco, and San Marino—were excluded from the dataset because they each had fewer than five infant deaths, producing extremely wide confidence intervals and IMR instability. The remaining 30 (88%) of the data pairs were then available for analysis.

Nations organized into groups

Nations were placed into the following five groups based on the number of vaccine doses they routinely give their infants: 12–14, 15–17, 18–20, 21–23, and 24–26 vaccine doses. The unweighted IMR means of all nations as a function of the number of vaccine doses were analyzed using linear regression. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) and coefficient of determination (r ) were calculated using GraphPad Prism, version 5.03 (GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA, USA, www.graphpad.com). Additionally, the F statistic and corresponding p values were computed to test if the best fit slope was statistically significantly non-zero. The Tukey-Kramer test was used to determine whether or not the mean IMR differences between the groups were statistically significant. Following the one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance) results from the Tukey-Kramer test, a post test for the overall linear trend was performed.

 


 







 

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CDC recommended shot schedule for 2022 here:  LINK

An overview of 2022 immunizations for newborns to 18-month-olds: Source

  • Hep B – One "newborn vaccine" is recommended at birth: the first dose of hepatitis B. The first dose is recommended early on in case mothers are knowingly or unknowingly hepatitis B positive. The Hep B vaccine schedule requires three doses in total. The second dose is recommended when your child is between 1 and 2 months old, and the third dose is recommended between 6 and 18 months.
  • Rotavirus – Depending on the manufacturer of the vaccine, your child may need two or three doses of the rotavirus vaccine, with the first dose being given at 2 months old and the second at 4 months old. If needed, the third dose is given at 6 months old. It’s important to note that this vaccine cannot be given after 8 months of age, so following the recommended schedule is especially important to ensure your child is protected.
  • DTaP – The diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine requires five doses. The first four are recommended at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and between 15 and 18 months old.
  • Hib – Depending on the manufacturer of the vaccine, your child may need three or four doses of the haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine. If three doses are needed, shots are given at 2 months, 4 months, and between 12 and 15 months old. If four doses are needed, kids also receive a dose at 6 months old.
  • PCV – The pneumococcal vaccine is a series of four doses taking place at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and between 12 and 15 months old.
  • IPV – The poliovirus vaccine is another four-dose series. The first three are recommended at 2 months, 4 months, and between 6 and 18 months old.
  • MMR – The measles, mumps and rubella vaccine is given in two doses. The schedule recommends the first MMR vaccine dose be given between 12 and 15 months old.
  • Varicella – The chickenpox vaccine is also given in two doses, with the first shot taking place between 12 and 15 months old.
  • Hep A – Like several other important vaccines, the hepatitis A vaccine requires two doses. The first dose is recommended at 12 months old.

 

 

(Although there is considerable evidence that a subset of infants has an increased risk of sudden death after receiving vaccines, health authorities eliminated "prophylactic vaccination" as an official cause of death, so medical examiners are compelled to misclassify and conceal vaccine-related fatalities under alternate cause-of-death classifications:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8255173/ )