It is frequently stated that 5,000-10,000 women were killed yearly from “back alley” abortions before legalized abortion, early abortionist and co-founder of NARAL Dr. Bernard Nathanson admitted that these numbers “were totally false.” He acknowledged, “…It was a useful figure, widely accepted, so why go out of our way to correct it with honest statistics?”

This is just a clip.  You can read the entire article at the link in the title.

 

 

OBGYN Who Has Delivered 5,000 Babies Confirms Abortion is Not Medically Necessary

Dr. Ingrid Skop   |   May 25, 2022   |   11:56AM   |   Washington, DC

 

The Reality

Although it is frequently stated that 5,000-10,000 women were killed yearly from “back alley” abortions before legalized abortion, early abortionist and co-founder of NARAL Dr. Bernard Nathanson admitted that these numbers “were totally false.” He acknowledged, “…[I]t was a useful figure, widely accepted, so why go out of our way to correct it with honest statistics?”[1] In fact, numerous sources document that the number of deaths from illegal abortions was far lower, in the range of a less than one hundred a year.[2]

The Medical Facts

Life-threatening situations requiring a separation of a mother and her unborn child occur far less commonly than one may assume.[4] Furthermore, an induced abortion should not be confused with a medical indication for separating a mother from her unborn child. The two differ greatly, on both the goals and procedures.

In an induced abortion, “the intention is that the fetus should not survive, and the process of abortion should achieve this.”[5] On the other hand, separation of the mother and fetus is “medically indicated” when there is some condition of the mother or the fetus which requires separation of the two in order to protect the life of one or the other (or both).[6]

Interventions in the second half of pregnancy are more correctly termed “premature parturition.” In these cases, the purpose of delivery is not to kill the fetus, as in elective abortion, but to save the life of the mother and the life of the fetus, or to save the life of at least one of them. This can be done in such a way, induction or C-section, that the baby is given an opportunity, even if slim, to live, while addressing the mother’s health risks. With modern surgical techniques, a C-section delivery is usually very safe, even in an extremely sick woman. (One out of three pregnancies in our country are delivered this way.) By comparison, a dilation and evacuation (D&E) dismemberment abortion (the technique used to perform 95% of late abortions[8]) may necessitate several days of cervical preparation to allow the surgeon to enter the uterus.[9]

If a woman were truly sick enough to need emergent delivery, the delay necessary to perform an induced abortion would only worsen her condition. Additionally, a truly sick woman should be delivered in a hospital with available emergency equipment rather than in an abortion facility, which may have less available resuscitative equipment and less stringent facility standards.

It is clearly the standard of care for any physician to intervene in a pregnancy that presents a risk to the mother’s life.  Laws restricting induced abortion will not prohibit such an intervention. Whether abortion is available, or whether a state or country has restricted abortion – even late-term abortions after a baby can feel pain from the procedure, – if a mother is facing medical risks from a pregnancy, her health can, should, and by medical standards must, be addressed. The medical procedures to treat these situations are able to be provided by OB/GYNs who overwhelmingly do not perform abortions. Additionally, when these medical situations arise, it is much safer for the mother to be treated in a medical setting with access to emergency care rather than an abortion facility. Lastly, regardless of the reason for termination of pregnancy, it has been documented consistently that women fare worse emotionally after a destructive abortion procedure for medically indicated situations than delivery by other standard obstetric interventions (e.g., induced labor or C-section).[24]